Jewish Holidaywear Earrings

The hinge style earwires of the Jewish holiday earrings are gold plated over surgical steel. I've found great beads and crystals from all over the world, which really glitter and sparkle. Some colors may be different from the photos as each batch of beads varies from lot to lot. The charms are 14 K gold plated and most of them are one-of-a-kind, designed by me. Whether you're looking for Chanukah earrings, Draydel earrings (dreidel earrings?), Purim earrings or Passover earrings, at $20. per pair you can collect the whole set!

Take a look; I hope my Yontifications Jewish holiday earrings make you smile. Don’t forget to look on the necklace page. You’ll find that many of the Yontifications earrings have beautiful complementary necklaces. Wear them together or wear them alone.

Choose from all our styles

Feelin' Jewish Earrings 1

An offbeat, offset, whimsical blend of complementary beads and charms create a unique set of Jewish earrings. FEELIN' JEWISH is a joyous way to express your Jewishness. The colorful crystals bounce and reflect light and color, glistening above the colorful enameled Star of David.

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Shabbat Earrings 1

An offbeat, offset, whimsical blend of complementary beads and charms create a unique set of Jewish Shabbat earrings.

SHABBAT, the day of rest, begins on Friday night. Just prior to sundown, we light the Shabbat candles. As part of our Shabbat meal we eat Challah, a braided egg bread. Traditionally, fresh flowers are brought to adorn the Shabbat home. Shabbat ends on Saturday night when 3 stars can be counted in the evening sky.

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Rosh Hashanah Earrings 1

An offbeat, offset, whimsical blend of complementary beads and charms create a unique set of Rosh Hashanah earrings.

ROSH HASHANAH is the Jewish New Year. It is a tradition to eat apples dipped in honey as a way of wishing all who partake a sweet new year. The New Year is welcomed with long and short blasts of the Shofar, a ram's horn that is sounded during the High Holidays.

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Sukkot Earrings 1

SUKKOT is the Fall Harvest festival. In ancient days the Israelites thanked G-d for a good harvest during a weeklong festival. Today, we celebrate by building and eating in temporary booths outside of our homes. We decorate them, often with colorful paper chains, represented by the strands of colorful seed beads. We also shake the Lulav, made up of three kinds of plants: myrtle, willow and palm, and smell the Etrog, a fragrant citrus fruit similar to a lemon.

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Chanukah Earrings 1

An offbeat, offset, whimsical blend of complementary beads and charms create a unique set of Chanukah draydel (dreidel) earrings.

CHANUKAH is also a festive holiday. It commemorates the rededication of the Temple and the victory of the Macabees over the Syrian-Greeks in 164 BCE. We celebrate by lighting the eight-candled Menorah, playing Dreidel (Draydel) and giving Gelt (coins).

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Tu B'Shevat Earrings 1

An offbeat, offset, whimsical blend of complementary beads and charms create a unique set of Tu B'Shevat Jewish holiday earrings.

TU B'SHEVAT, literally the 15th day of the month of Shevat, is the new year of the trees. We recognize the importance of trees in our world as a supplier of our basic needs: food, shelter and oxygen. To celebrate Tu B'Shevat we plant trees both at home and in Israel and eat of the fruit of various trees.

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Purim Earrings 1

An offbeat, offset, whimsical blend of complementary beads and charms create a unique set of Purim earrings complete with tiny tinkling bells.

On PURIM we read the Megillah (Book of Esther). Esther is the heroine of the story in which the Jews of Persia are saved from the evil Haman. We dress up in costumes, wear masks and make loud, booing noises whenever Haman's name is read. Recently, a new custom has arisen of ringing bells whenever Esther's name is read. A favorite treat eaten during Purim is Hamentaschen, fruit-filled, 3-cornered cookies.

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Passover (Pesach) Earrings 1

An offbeat, offset, whimsical blend of complementary beads and charms create a unique set of Passover earrings.

On PESACH (Passover), we re-enact the story of the exodus from Egypt. We share in a festive meal called a Seder. During the Seder, we eat, among other things, Matzah (unleavened bread) and drink four cups of wine.

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YOM HA'ATZMAUT Earrings 1

An offbeat, offset, whimsical blend of complementary beads and charms create a unique set of Yom Ha'atzmaut earrings.

YOM HA'ATZMAUT is Israel’s Independence Day. The modern State of Israel was founded in 1948 and every year we celebrate Israel's birthday with parades and by waving flags. Israel has been known by many names, one of which is the land of milk and honey. And what would a trip to Israel be without a camel ride?

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Shavuot, Simchat Torah, Bat Mitzvah Earrings 1

An offbeat, offset, whimsical blend of complementary beads and charms create a unique set of earrings that can be worn on Shavuot, Simchat Torah or any time that you read Torah. It also makes a great Bat Mitzvah gift.

SHAVUOT celebrates the giving of the Torah (5 Books of Moses) to Moses and the people of Israel at Mount Sinai. The Torah is decorated as a way of showing honor and respect. Rimonim often adorn the tops of the handles. A portion of the Torah is read every week. A special pointer called a Yad is used to read the Torah so as not to get any oils from our own fingers on the parchment. These earrings can also be worn by a BAT MITZVAH, when a 13 year old girl is called to read from the Torah for the first time.

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chozzerai of the week

“OMG, how cute are these?

Shabbat earrings—could you die over the little candlesticks? I’m more into the tribal bone look myself, but I seriously love these from Yontifications.com, a line of Holy Day-inspired jewelry designed by Judaica superstar Susan Fischer Weis.

Really, you need to check out the whole year—the adorable little shofar for Rosh Hashanah had me squealing like someone put baby bunnies in my sock drawer. And Sukkot’s baby lulav and etrog— lady, you’re killing me! The mini-matzohs and teeny hamantashen are so freakin’ precious I want to become a Hebrew school teacher so I could have an appreciative audience for them.”

—Yo, Yenta!